Episode 135: Personality Testing

On this episode of Life, the Universe & Everything Else, Ashlyn, Gem, Laura, and Lauren put their personalities to the test, explore the history of the Myers–Briggs Type Indicator, and try to determine whether any of these personality tests are actually science-based.

Life, the Universe & Everything Else is a podcast that delves into issues of science, critical thinking, and secular humanism.

MBTI: The Myers–Briggs Foundation | The Myers-Briggs Personality Test Is Bullshit (VICE) | Have we all been duped by the Myers-Briggs test? (Fortune) | Myers–Briggs Type Indicator (Wikipedia)

DISC: DISC assessment (Wikipedia) | William Moulton Marston (Wikipedia) | Elizabeth Holloway Marston (Wikipedia) | Olive Byrne (Wikipedia) | DISC Personality Testing

True Colors: Research Validity and Reliability (True Colors International) | Four temperaments (Wikipedia) | Personality type (Wikipedia) | Keirsey Temperament Sorter (Wikipedia) | History and Origin of Personality Temperament Theory (True Colors International)

Big Five (OCEAN): No frills analysis: “The Big Five” personality test (wbir.com) | Most Personality Quizzes Are Junk Science. I Found One That Isn’t. (FiveThirtyEight) | Big Five personality traits (Wikipedia)

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Episode 134: Replication Crisis!

On this episode of Life, the Universe & Everything Else, Gem is joined by Ashlyn, Laura, and Lauren to discuss the unfolding replication crisis in science, with a focus on several high profile psychological studies whose results have been called into question.

Life, the Universe & Everything Else is a podcast that delves into issues of science, critical thinking, and secular humanism.

Links: Replication crisis (Wikipedia) | Reproducibility Project (Wikipedia) | Replications in Psychology Research: How Often Do They Really Occur? (Matthew C. Makel) | How Many Scientists Fabricate and Falsify Research? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Survey (PLOS One) | Diederik Stapel now has 58 retractions (Retraction Watch) | The Marshmallow Test: What Does It Really Measure? (The Atlantic) | Predicting Adolescent Cognitive and Self-Regulatory Competencies from Preschool Delay of Gratification: Identifying Diagnostic Conditions (Shoda et al.) | Revisiting the Marshmallow Test: A Conceptual Replication Investigating Links Between Early Delay of | You’re not going to believe what I’m about to tell you (The Oatmeal) | Facts matter after all: rejecting the “backfire effect” (Oxford Education Blog) | Everyone is sharing this comic about the “backfire effect” … but there’s a huge catch (Mashable) | Confirmation bias (Wikipedia) | We’ve been told we’re living in a post-truth age. Don’t believe it. (Slate) | Has the Backfire Effect of Debunkings Been Debunked? (Daily Kos) | Famous Milgram ‘electric shocks’ experiment drew wrong conclusions about evil, say psychologists (The Independent) | Rethinking One of Psychology’s Most Infamous Experiments (The Atlantic) | The Shocking Truth of the Notorious Milgram Obedience Experiments (The Crux) | How many people really went through with the Milgram Experiment? (IO9) | Milgram experiment (Wikipedia) | Inflicted insight (Wikipedia) | Electric Schlock: Did Stanley Milgram’s Famous Obedience Experiments Prove Anything? (Pacific Standard) | Would You Do as a Robot Commands? An Obedience Study for Human-Robot Interaction (Cormier et al.) | Stanford prison experiment (Wikipedia) | The Stanford Prison Experiment was massively influential. We just learned it was a fraud. (Vox) | The Lifespan of a Lie (Trust Issues) | Why the Stanford Prison Experiment is a Lie (Rebecca Watson) | Episode 94: Free Will (LUEE) | Episode 106: Parapsychology (LUEE) | Retraction Watch

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Episode 106: Parapsychology

In this episode of Life, the Universe & Everything Else, Gem, Lauren, Ashlyn, and Laura discuss the Ganzfeld Experiments, the Global Consciousness Project, Rupert Sheldrake, Daryl Bem, and a psychic dog, and then we finally find out exactly how psychic the panel is with a game of Psychic Fact or Psychic Fiction!

Life, the Universe & Everything Else is a program promoting secular humanism and scientific skepticism that is produced by the Winnipeg Skeptics.

Links: Parapsychology (Wikipedia) | Ganzfeld experiment (Wikipedia) | Global Consciousness Project (Wikipedia) | Global Consciousness (The Skeptic’s Dictionary) | Rupert Sheldrake (Wikipedia) | Scientific Heretic Rupert Sheldrake on Morphic Fields, Psychic Dogs and Other Mysteries (Scientific American Blog Network) | Why science needs to publish negative results (Elsevier) | Daryl Bem (Wikipedia) | Feeling the Future: Experimental Evidence for Anomalous Retroactive Influences on Cognition and Affect (Daryl Bem) | Back from the Future: Parapsychology and the Bem Affair (CSI) | How much is that doggy in the window? (Richard Wiseman) | Methods of divination (Wikipedia)

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Episode 105: Mental Health & Stigma

In this episode of Life, the Universe & Everything Else, Lauren discusses mental health with Ashlyn, Gem, and Laura, with a focus on treatments and associated stigmas, current and historical.

Life, the Universe & Everything Else is a program promoting secular humanism and scientific skepticism that is produced by the Winnipeg Skeptics.

Links: History of mental disorders (Wikipedia) | Trepanning (Wikipedia) | Psychiatry in Ancient Egypt (BJPsych Bulletin) | Humorism (Wikipedia) | Dosha (Wikipedia) | Bedlam revisited: A history of Bethlem hospital 1634-1770. | Electroconvulsive therapy (Wikipedia) | TRC #366: Accent Bias + Electroshock Therapy + Did A Cat Take A Bullet For A Kid? (The Reality Check) | Lobotomy (Wikipedia) | The History of Mental Illness: From “Skull Drills” to “Happy Pills” (Student Pulse) | Fighting Stigma: A Closer Look at Mental Illness Throughout History (YouTube) | The hidden medical logic of mental health stigma (Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry) | Initiatives: Opening Minds (Mental Health Commission of Canada) | The Stigma Associated with Mental Illness (Canadian Mental Health Association) | Exposing Canada’s ugly mental-health secret (The Globe and Mail) | Your Mental Health (Canadian Mental Health Association) | What to do about the antidepressants, antibiotics and other drugs in our water (Ensia) | Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (Wikipedia) | Addressing Mental Health Treatment Barriers (Psychology Today) | Let’s Talk About How My Job at Bell Gave Me Mental Health Issues and No Benefits (CANADALAND) | Ten Days in a Mad-House (Nellie Bly) | Reasonable Vegan | Episode 82: What Have You Changed Your Mind About? (LUEE)

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Episode 92: New Year’s Resolutions and Behaviour Change

In this episode of Life, the Universe & Everything Else, Laura, Gem, Ashlyn, and Ian discuss New Year’s Resolutions, how difficult it can be to change habits and behaviours, and some evidence-based ways to maximize your chances of succeeding in your goals.

Life, the Universe & Everything Else is a program promoting secular humanism and scientific skepticism that is produced by the Winnipeg Skeptics and the Humanists, Atheists & Agnostics of Manitoba.

Note: Although Gem mentioned that the month of January is named for the Roman god Janus (Ianus), some sources dispute this, attributing the name of the month to the goddess Juno (Iuno).

Links: New Year’s resolution (Wikipedia) | Ianuarius (Wikipedia) | New Years Resolution Statistics (Statistic Brain) | Experiment: Resolutions (Quirkology) | Stanford marshmallow experiment (Wikipedia) | The Odds Of Actually Keeping Your New Year’s Resolution (Louise Firth Campbell) | Why willpower matters and how to get it (The Guardian) | Willpower: How You Can Get More of It and Why It Runs Out (WebMD) | A prospective study of holiday weight gain (PubMed) | Auld lang syne: success predictors, change processes, and self-reported outcomes of New Year’s resolvers and nonresolvers (PubMed) | Why Do Some Turtles 'Breathe' Out of Their Butts? (Discovery News) | SparkPeople | HabitRPG (Gamify Your Life)

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Episode 70: The Science of Arguing

Episode 70: The Science of Arguing

In this episode of Life, the Universe & Everything Else, Greg Christensen discusses the science of argumentation and persuasion with Richelle McCullough and special guest Seren Gordon.

Life, the Universe & Everything Else is a program promoting secular humanism and scientific skepticism presented by the Winnipeg Skeptics and the Humanists, Atheists & Agnostics of Manitoba.

Links: The Science of Why We Don’t Believe Science | Tim Ball | The Dunning-Kruger Effect | The Backfire Effect Shows Why You Can’t Use Facts to Win an Argument | Want to Win a Political Debate? Try Making a Weaker Argument | Study: To the Human Brain, Me Is We | Argument: When Losing Is Winning | A Field Guide to Climate Change Skeptics | Image: President Bush Welcomes President-Elect Obama, Former President Clinton, Former President Bush, and Former President Carter to the White House | LeVar Burton Explains How Not to Be Killed by Police | When Prophecy Fails, by Leon Festinger

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SkeptiCamp Winnipeg 2012: Robots and Emotions

On Saturday, 29 September 2012, the Winnipeg Skeptics held their third annual SkeptiCamp event. SkeptiCamp Winnipeg is a conference for the sharing of ideas. It is free and open to the public: anyone can attend and participate! Presentations and discussions focus on science and free inquiry, and the audience is encouraged to challenge presenters to defend their ideas.

Dr. Jim Young is a researcher in computer science at the University of Manitoba specializing in human-robot interaction. He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Calgary, where he focused on mixing robotic interface design with sociology, and worked for four years at the University of Tokyo, designing easy-to-use robotic interfaces for the general public.

SkeptiCamp is an open conference celebrating science and critical thinking. For more information please visit SkeptiCamp.org.